Protecting patient safety

Check out @ASAGrassroots’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/ASAGrassroots/status/981951115062337536?s=09

#NewYork budget excluded provision that would have undermined physician-led anesthesia care, opposed by @ASALifeline & @NYSSApga. #THANKYOU to New York lawmakers for protecting patient safety. #SafeAnesthesia4NY
https://t.co/3M5wQm0TK8

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Responsibility for your own health

I was shocked to see that the NHS could ban surgery for the obese and smokers.  That’s socialized medicine.  You take a conglomerate group of people (the UK) on a limited budget for healthcare… and basically find the cheapest most cost-effective way to deliver healthcare.  But in a way, it’s empowering patients to take responsibility for their own health.  Smoking, for sure — I agree 100% that surgery should be banned for this population.  Obesity is a bit trickier — there’s genetics and environmental factors at play in this one.  I don’t think anyone chooses to be obese.  But, people do have the power to change their eating and exercise habits.  Despite these efforts, there are some people who are still obese…. and these people should not be faulted.

Why single out the obese and smokers?

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From SlideShare
obesity-and-cv-disease-1ppt-43-728
From SlideShare
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From TobaccoFreeLife.org

Smokers and the obese have elevated surgical risk and mortality, which means more cost to treat and hospitalize and provide ongoing care.

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From HealthStats

I think the NHS is on to something here.  They’re opening doors to moving the liability and responsibility away from physicians and towards patients.  This is a plus.  Outsiders may see it as separatism and elitist to only provide care for people who are healthy.  But look at the facts and the data…. obesity has a lot of co-morbidities associated.  Smoking has a lot of co-morbidities associated as well.  Why should physicians be penalized for re-admissions, poor wound healing, longer hospitalizations when the underlying conditions themselves are already challenging enough?  In fact, I would urge insurance companies to provide incentives to patients/the insured with discounted rates for good and maintained health and wellness.  With all the technologies, medications, and information out there, it’s time patients take responsibility for their own health.  I take responsibility for mine — watching my diet, exercising, working on getting enough rest, maintaining activities to keep my mind and body engaged, meditating for rest and relaxation.  It’s not easy, but my health is 100% my responsibility.  I refuse to pass the buck to my husband, my family, my physician, etc.  I do what I can to optimize my health and future — and if that doesn’t work… I call for backup.

Patients need to change their mindset re: health.  It is not your spouse’s responsibility to track your meds.  It is your responsibility to know your medical conditions and surgical history.  The single most important (and thoughtful) thing a patient can do is keep an up-to-date list of medications, past/current medical history, surgical history, and allergies to bring to every doctor’s appointment and surgery.  This helps streamline and bring to the forefront your conditions and how these will interplay with your medical and surgical plan and postoperative care.  Please do not forget recreational drugs, smoking habit, and drinking habit in this list.  It is very important to know all of these things.  Also, your emotional history is very important.  Depression, anxiety, failure to cope, etc.  This all helps tie in your current living situation with stressors and your medical history.

Links for educating yourself in taking responsibility for your health:

obesity
From SilverStarUK.org

Emergency Checklists

It seems like in today’s day and age, emergencies are occurring everywhere.  From hurricanes to shooters to earthquakes and fires… I think it’s always important to know what to do.  Here are some fabulous checklists I’ve found for getting through those emergencies.  These are not substitutions for knowledge and training.  Clinical judgement warranted.

Emergency Manual from Stanford — Printable PDF

Ariadne Labs OR Crisis Checklist

Ariadne Labs Safe Surgery Checklist Template

Ariadne Labs Ambulatory Safe Surgery Checklist Template

Project Check

Newton-Wellesley’s L&D Checklists

WHO Safe Childbirth Checklist

Checklist for Trauma Anesthesia

ASRA checklist for Local Anesthetic Systemic Toxicity

WHO Surgical Safety Checklist

WHO H1N1 Checklist

Johns Hopkins Central Line Checklist

STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Checklist

Ariadne Labs Cardiac Surgery Checklist

STS General Thoracic Surgery Checklist

STS Congenital Heart Surgery Checklist

University of Kansas Daily ICU Quality Checklist

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Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest

Case

 

 

OpenAnesthesia.org: Cerebral ischemia: deep hypothermia

SCA 2013 PBLD: Anesthetic Management for Deep Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest

BJA: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. July 2010

JCVA: Perioperative management of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Aug 2010.

Anaesthesia, Pain, and Intensive Care: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest – anesthetic considerations. Aug 2016.

Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery:  REVIEW: The methodologies of hypothermic circulatory arrest and of antegrade and retrograde cerebral perfusion for aortic arch surgery. 2008.

Cardiac Surgery in a Jehovah’s Witness Patient

AVR

Brief case summary

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From Nata Online

Literature Search

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From Nata Online

Antifibrinolytic Debate

HeartWare vs. HeartMate LVAD

A couple of weeks ago, I took care of a patient who desperately needed to get better from acute CHF.  At that time, we placed the patient on an impella… but the next day, it was deemed that he needed ECMO to reperfuse his organs.  After a week on ECMO with continued impella support, ECMO was titrated down and off while maintaining 3.9L/min flow from the impella.  During the wean off ECMO, the patient had been extubated and was mentating clearly and interacting appropriately.

Fast forward a couple days after getting extubated, the patient was ripe for an LVAD.  But which one? (We ended up placing the patient on HeartWare LVAD).

YouTube: LVAD 101 – Anatomy & Physiology

YouTube: LVAD Pathophysiology


HeartWare

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HeartWare brochure

YouTube vid of HeartWare (no sound) ; Vid of HeartWare with detailed explanation

 

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HeartMate II

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HeartMate II website

YouTube vid of HeartMate II


Summary

  • Cost-effectiveness: HeartWare > HeartMate II (UK NHS study, April 2014)
  • LV Geometry: HeartWare = HeartMate II (J CT Surg, 2013)
  • Stroke & GI bleed risk: HeartWare > HeartMate II (J Card Surg 2013)
  • Risk of device failure: HeartWare < HeartMate II
  • ENDURANCE trial: Randomized patients eligible for DT 2:1 to the HeartWare centrifugal flow LVAD versus the HeartMate II axial flow LVAD. The trial did reach its primary noninferiority endpoint of stroke free survival at 2 years (55.0% in the HeartWare patients versus 57.4% in the HeartMate II patients). Of note, a change in the design of the HeartWare device during the trial (sintering of the inflow cannula) appeared to decrease the incidence of pump thrombosis. Overall, the stroke rate was higher in the HeartWare arm whereas device malfunctions requiring exchange or urgent transplantation were more common in the HeartMate II arm. Data analysis suggested that better blood pressure control in the HeartWare arm may decrease the stroke rate and a second cohort of patients is being enrolled with more attention being paid to blood pressures management.

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Ventricular Assist Devices: Impella

“There’s an emergent case coming for impella placement.”

Impella?  I’ve read about these devices and I’m familiar with managing patients on LVADs as well as providing anesthesia for LVAD placement.  But, I’ve never done an Impella on a critically unstable patient.

YouTube video describing the purpose and placement of the Impella

Cath Lab Digest: Overview of Impella 5.0

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Anesthesia & Analgesia; January 2012. Echo rounds: The Use of TEE for Confirmation of Appropriate Impella 5.0 Device Placement.

From A&A Echo Rounds

 YouTube video similar to our axillary artery conduit (we had to go left sided bc of a prior AICD in the patient’s right chest) for Impella 5.0

JCVA, June 2010. Review Articles: Percutaneous LVAD: Clinical Uses, Future Applications, and Anesthetic Considerations.