Left Atrial Occlusion Devices

Our hospital is starting to do more left atrial occlusion devices for people who have afib and aren’t able to tolerate blood thinners. Currently, two types are offered by our cardiologists: Watchman procedure (endocardial) vs Lariat procedure (epicardial).

Lariat

It look and acts similar to a lariat or lasso.  An external guide wire with a magnet at its tip is introduced outside the heart towards the left atrial appendage (LAA). Another wire with a magnet at its tip is introduced from a groin vein and it traverses the interatrial septum to sit at the most distal point inside the LAA. The magnets “connect” and the lariat is introduced along the external guide wire and essentially lassos the LAA.

Lariat procedure
Watchman

A large occlusion device is inserted via a groin vein and traverses the interatrial septum into the proximal (base or largest opening) left atrial appendage. The device gets deployed and successfully occludes the LAA.

Watchman

PPT on Watchman from Boston Scientific

Is one better than the other?

Endocardial (Watchman) vs epicardial (Lariat) left atrial appendage exclusion devices: Understanding the differences in the location and type of leaks and their clinical implications.  Pillarisetti J, et al. Heart Rhythm. 2015.

CONCLUSION: The Lariat device is associated with a lower rate of leaks at 1 year as compared with the Watchman device, with no difference in rates of cerebrovascular accident. There was no correlation between the presence of residual leak and the occurrence of cerebrovascular accident.

Anesthesia

For these cases, we typically have a good flowing peripheral IV and intubate these patients for general anesthesia. There’s a fair amount of TEE required for placement and verification of correct positioning of the device. Both procedures require transseptal access. Watch for hypotension as there is a risk for pericardial effusion.

TEE for Lariat

TEE for Lariat


TEE for Watchman

Watchman TEE

Echo Essentials for Endoluminal LAA Closure: April 2014 Cardiac Interventions Today

The WATCHMAN Left Atrial Appendage Closure Device for Atrial Fibrillation: J Vis Exp. 2012; (60): 3671

Anesthesia and Transesophageal Echocardiography for WATCHMAN Device Implantation: December 2016Volume 30, Issue 6, Pages 1685–1692.

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From JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions
PDF Article

Percutaneous Left Atrial Appendage Closure
Procedural Techniques and Outcomes

3D Echo inside the Cath Lab – A must in LAA Closure. London, 2016.

ECHONOMY:Tools for Echocardiographic Calculations

YouTube: LEFT ATRIAL APPENDAGE CLOSURE PROCEDURE : Role of Transesophageal Echocardiography

YouTube: TCTAP 2015 SHD Live Case Session: LAA Closure

YouTube: How to image the inter-atrial septum using 3D-TEE “RATLe-90 maneuver”

YouTube: TOE in LA Appendage Assessment by Jason Sharp

**ASEcho.org 2017**

WATCHMAN:
 
Baseline TEE:
·       Full Scripps TEE protocol
·       Measure the LAA at the following views:
o   0°, 45°, 90°, 135°
·       Report the LAA maximal orifice, as well as the LAA dimensions at each angle using the following Xcelera drop-downs under “Left Atrium”:
 
·       Comment on presence or absence of atrial thrombus or “smoke”
·       Optional: Comment on LAA shape (ie: cauliflower, chicken wing, windsock, cactus)
 

 

Intra-Procedural TEE:
·       Comment on presence or absence of atrial thrombus

·       Report the LAA maximal orifice using the following Xcelera drop-down under “Left Atrium”:

·       Enter LAA device size and implantation date under the “History” section in Xcelera
·       Comment on the presence or absence of a residual leak using the following Xcelera drop-down under “Left Atrium”:
 
·       If a residual leak is present, comment on the size (mm) of the leak using the following Xcelera drop-down under “Left Atrium”:
 
·       Iatrogenic ASD with direction of shunting
·       Comment on any post-procedure pericardial effusion (compare to baseline)

 

 
Post-Procedure Discharge TTE (pt. in hospital):
·       LIMITED 2D TTE to rule out pericardial effusion (unless order specifies otherwise)
·       Spectral Doppler for respirophasic flow changes if an effusion is present

 

 
45-Day, 6 Month, 1 year and 2 year F/U TEEs:
·       Comment on presence or absence of atrial thrombus
·       Comment on the presence or absence of a residual leak using the following Xcelera drop-down under “Left Atrium”:
 
·       If a residual leak is present, comment on the size (mm) of the leak using the following Xcelera drop-down under “Left Atrium”:
 
·       Carry over LAA device size and implantation date under the “History” section in Xcelera

·       Comment on Iatrogenic ASD with direction of shunting, if still present

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TAVR Team: conscious sedation vs. general anesthesia

Today, we had a guest speaker Christian Spies from Queen’s Hospital in Hawaii who spoke on his experience with his TAVR team and conscious sedation vs. general anesthesia for these patients.  More specifically, we are speaking of the transfemoral route.

Keypoints:

  • Patient selection is key (consider for COPD; bad for OSA)
  • Short surgical time for monitored anesthesia care (MAC)
  • Decrease invasive monitoring (no PA catheter,+/-CVP)
  • No difference in hospital LOS or 1 year mortality rate
  • Move from TEE to TTE if MAC
  • Be prepared to convert MAC to GA (can be difficult in already tenuous patient in a crowded space under the drapes)
  • MAC agents: dexmetetomidine, propofol, ofirimev
  • Decrease pressor use
  • Develop an algorithm for MAC vs. GA and patient selection

From goinggentleintothatgoodnight.com

For my own lit search:


***Update May 1, 2018***

We at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla do most of our transfemoral TAVRs via conscious sedation assuming appropriate patient selection.  These patients still tend to be the inoperable patients not cleared for open heart AVR (aortic valve replacement).  My techniques and choices for setup have changed over time as I’ve had a chance to fine-tune my plan based on prior experiences with TAVR.  Patients typically come to the hybrid room with a 20g PIV placed by the pre-op RN.

My Setup:

  • 4 channel Alaris pump:
    • dexmedetomidine @ 0.7 mcg/kg/hr until incision –> 0.4 mcg/kg/hr until valve deployment –> off
    • norepinephrine @ 2 mcg/min (titrating on/off, up/down as vitals suggest)
    • Isolyte (IV carrier fluid) @ 200ml/hr until valve deployment –> 50ml/hr
  • Cordis neck line
    • Initially, I would have the interventional cardiologist setup a femoral venous line since they’re getting access to the groin.  However, the cardiologist would use that femoral line for emergent ECMO cannulation and I would lose my venous access and have to depend on a measly 20g PIV.  Nowadays, I try for a short 14g or 16g PIV.  If I can’t get one, the patient gets an awake right IJ cordis for large venous access.
  • Hot line fluid warmer with blood-Y tubing: this is for hookup to a large PIV or cordis line
  • Right radial arterial line
    • I started only placing right radial arterial lines because there was a case of a dissection and I immediately lost my left radial arterial line and couldn’t do pressure monitoring.  I insist on only using the RIGHT radial for my arterial monitoring.  Do not let the cardiologist only give you arterial monitoring based on their femoral arterial access.  It will only give you intermittent monitoring and there are critical points leading up to the deployment where you need CONTINUOUS arterial monitoring.  Therefore, I’ve found the right RADIAL arterial line best for continuous monitoring.
  • Facemask for continuous oxygen at 10L/mim with ETCO2 monitoring
  • For trans-subclavian/axillary approach vs. transfemoral approach TAVR, I’ll put in a supraclavicular block right after Cordis/large-bore PIV venous access for patient comfort while still utilizing conscious sedation/MAC.

My Technique:

  • When the patient gets to the room, transfer patient to OR table.  Start IV fluids @ 200ml/hr.  Cases that go well are about 2 hours from start to end.
  • Facemask O2 at 10L/min.
  • Start sedation: precedex/dexmedetomidine @ 0.7 mcg/kg/hr.  Some patients may receive 1-2mg midazolam x 1 and 25-50mcg fentanyl for radial art line placement.
  • Place right radial art line with lidocaine for skin numbing.  Place PIV with lidocaine.  If unable to get access for PIV, prep neck –> sterile gown/glove/drapes for U/S guided Cordis placement with lidocaine.
  • OR staff preps patient.  Antibiotics prior to incision.
  • At incision –> precedex to 0.4 mcg/kg/hr.  25-50mcg fentanyl PRN discomfort. 10-20mg propofol push for discomfort if needed while large sheath placed for valve deployment.
  • Crossing valve –> BP changes.  Manage with volume or levophed.
  • Valvuloplasty
  • Don’t treat over-drive pacing too aggressively when the valve is deployed.  Typically, once the new valve is in, a little volume will help normalize the BP.
  • Once valve is deployed, turn precedex off.  No other sedation or BP meds needed.  Change IVF rate to 50ml/hr.
  • Patient heads to PACU awake, interactive, and comfortable.

What techniques do you like to do?  Any suggestions on a different approach?