IABP

There’s always a good reason to review the physiology and reasons for placement of an Intra Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP).  We come across these a couple of times a month in our cardiac patients.  They’re a great temporary measure to stabilizing and treating the patient.

Contemporary Clinical Niche for Intra-Aortic Balloon Counterpulsation in Perioperative Cardiovascular Practice: An Evidence-Based Review for the Cardiovascular Anesthesiologist. JCVA, February 2017. Volume 31, Issue 1, Pages 309–320.

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From JCVA, Feb 2017.

One of the best explanations that I have ever seen for the IABP is from Dr. Rishi Kumar.  He’s a board certified anesthesiologist and is ICU fellowship trained and is pursuing a cardiac anesthesia fellowship as well.  This lovely human is no joke.  I’ve read his blog and his instagram posts, and he’s a wonderful teacher and mentor to those he reaches.  Please click his link for an entry regarding IABPs on his blog.

RKMD.com: Intra-Aortic Balloon Pump, Arterial Line, and EKG Waveforms. April 2018.

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TEE for placement of IABP

Anesthesia & Analgesia, July 2011. Vol 113, No. 1.

  • Want the tip 1-2 cm from left subclavian artery (LSCA)
  • X-plane aortic arch down to descending aorta to see the left subclavian artery
  • Visible during systole when the IABP balloon is deflated

Good visualization of the LSCA

A Novel Technique for Intra-aortic Balloon Positioning in the Intensive Care Unit.  J Extra Corpor Technol. 2012 Sep; 44(3): 160–162.

 

IABP and pVADs: Clinical Effectiveness Versus Cost

invasivecardiology

By Atman P. Shah, MD, FACC, FSCAI
Clinical Director, Section of Cardiology
Co-Director, Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory
Associate Professor of Medicine
The University of Chicago

Interventional cardiologists are increasingly able to take care of complex coronary artery disease in a population of patients that would have be been deemed too high-risk a decade ago. However, many of these patients have poor left ventricular function and may need to undergo prolonged ischemic times during percutaneous revascularization. There are a number of support devices available for interventional cardiologists to use, and given that every single patient is different, it is up to the operator to personalize therapy within the construct of available data. But, the available data are not entirely clear and do not seem to clearly favor one device over another. Given the changing economics of health care, if there is no clear winning device, should cost influence a physician’s decision? The…

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