Montessori floor bed

As Arden is getting older and bigger, I’m wondering if she will outgrow her pack and play that has been her bassinet and crib since she was born. At school, she naps on a floor bed. The times we have tried to get her to nap at home on a floor mattress, she wanders around her room. That was prior to her really crawling around. Now almost 11 months old, she is so fast at crawling and getting around…I’m worried she’ll wander around her room and not get a good night’s rest. But, maybe the ability to explore and be comfortable in her own space is exactly what she needs…

One family’s Montessori floor bed experience from 2013

How we Montessori – Transitioning to a floor bed

ClockWorkRise – Floor bed transition

Kavanaugh report: realities of a montessori floor bed

CanDoKiddo: Montessori floor bed sleep problems

The Full Montessori: floor bed confidential

The Baby Sleep Site – How and when to transition your toddler from a crib to a bed

YouTube: Live well, Jess – Montessori floor bed experience

YouTube: Why not Montessori – Montessori floor bed and Our Experience

YouTube: Mellow Mama – Montessori floor bed

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Sleep Schedules for Babies

I’m learning so much along this parenting journey! Right now, I’m just trying to read as much as I can in preparation for the next step. Arden is 5 weeks old and we’re managing to keep the sanity around here. Improving our sleep would be a huge bonus for us — so maybe sleep schedules are the place to start.

easy-schedules-cheat-sheet
From Diary of a Fit Mommy


Here’s what we’ll go with when Arden reaches 4 months:

4 Month Old = June 20 (start from due date not birthdate)
  • 6:30-7:00a = wake, feeding
  • 8:30a = NAP –> Wake, feed
  • 11:30a = NAP –> Wake, feed
  • 3:00p = NAP — not past 4p –> Wake, feed
  • 6:30p = final feed; bedtime prep
  • 7:00p = bedtime
  • (9:30-11:30p = dream feed/pump = optional)
  • 1:00a (or after, but before 4a) = night feed

All naps < 2 hours

  • Establish feeding relationship (lactation consultant, breast, bottle)
    • Swaddling, pacifier, white noise
    • From 7a-9p: NOT sleep longer than 2 hours at a time. When wake from nap —> 30-50 min awake time (including feed) —> NAP
  • When wake from nap —> feed (even if previous feed was <2 hours prior)
      • If not ready to feed —> wait 15-30min and try again.
    • 30 min before bedtime —> feed baby in well LIT room (keep baby as awake as possible during feed) —> swaddle.
      • **Unless absolutely necessary —> avoid changing diaper or unsaddling until morning. If must —> use <15 watt bulb or red light.
  • ** Between 4:00a and 6:30a —> NOT enter baby room unless an emergency. **
Make sure bedtime occurs about 12 hours after morning wake up.
Pump before bed (around 9:00-11:00p).
** Nap Train at the same time as Sleep Train. **
Ask daycare to use white noise and darkness.
Caretakers NEVER revert to helping child fall asleep.
** At least 90 – 105 minute gap from end of nap to start of next one. **
NAP = actual time went to sleep (not put in crib).
4-7 month old = nap 3x/day
  • 7-14 month old = nap 2x/day (9:00a, 1:30p)
  • If eating solids —> breakfast about 1 hour after morning waking. Lunch around 12:00p. Dinner about 2 hours after waking from 2nd nap (around 2 hours before bedtime).

Update: April 20, 2018
Arden is almost 2.5 months old! We’ve been extremely lucky that she has declared herself for naps and bedtime that’s pretty similar to this 4 month schedule. She sleeps about a 7 hour stretch and gets up around 2-3 am for a quick feed. She goes back down in her bassinet for another 2-3 hours and wakes around 6a. We also put her bassinet in her own room after running that by her pediatrician.

Update: June 18, 2018

Arden is 4 months old.  She has been enjoying her sleep schedule.  We put her down around 6:30/7p and she usually sleeps until 5am.  She usually gets up once during the night for a feed (anywhere from 1a-5a, but usually around 5a).  We’ll do a feed and then she’ll go back down until around 7/7:30a.  Her naps range from 30min to 2+ hours.  We let her dictate her nap schedule as we’ll look for her sleep cues (rubbing her eyes, eyes getting tired, yawning, getting more fussy, etc.).  Additionally, we usually don’t actively wake her from nap — we let her cry for us when she’s ready to wake up.  We’ll immediately do a feed upon waking.  We’ve learned it’s crucial for her to get her naps (and not get them on-the-go) as she will get more fussy throughout the day with missed naps and then it gets harder for her to get her to sleep when it’s her bedtime.  Overall, the sleep schedule we’ve been following has worked out really well for her.

Sleep Deprivation Significantly Affects Mood Status of Anesthesiologists

Sleep Deprivation Significantly Affects Mood Status of Anesthesiologistshttp://goo.gl/uKRPem

Everything was significantly affected: tension, anger, fatigue, irritability. And from a cognitive standpoint, reaction time, in particular, increased in all subjects.