Work-Life Balance and taking care of yourself

Work-life balance and taking care of yourself #anes17 #meded #stress #medicine #burnout #administrators

The ASA 2017 had an interesting self-study module called Physician Wellness Beyond the Usual Suspects.  It was a great learning tool to focus on the importance of the anesthesiologist to consider their own stress levels and seeing how to best mitigate the issues that could be problematic.

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Check out these great articles from that self-study module:

Key points:

  • Understand your own stress levels.
  • Make changes: speak to your staff, your administrators, your hospital to see what’s available to help you cope
  • Get help
  • Sometimes you can’t fix everything… and ultimately that’s ok.

“It is obvious that we can no more explain a passion to a person who has never experienced it than we can explain light to the blind.”

-T. S. Eliot

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When life overwhelms

I’ve taken this week off as a staycation to catch up with life.  We’re nearing the end of our wedding planning and everything is falling into place.  I think when times get a bit overwhelming, it’s helpful for me to take a step back and take a breather.  Whether that’s taking time for myself or diving into a project or doing some inner soul searching… I like to take some time to prioritize my mind and body to get it back on track.

What do you do to get back on track?

Image from IrishTimes
Image from IrishTimes

6 ways to stay positive

How to cultivate positive thoughts in negative situations

Stay positive

Seeing the positive in a negative situation

The most important thing is a mental reset.  Try and learn from each situation.  If you’re too overwhelmed to learn, then try and make small changes by shifting your negative thoughts to positive ones.  Maybe then, you’ll be able to discover the lesson and truly discover the goodness and positivity in life.

How long have I got left?

A beautifully written piece regarding the amazingly brave and young neurosurgeon who grappled with his own mortality from the perspective of the physician as well as the patient.  A truly excellent read.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/25/opinion/sunday/how-long-have-i-got-left.html?fb_ref=Default&_r=0

Posted from Stanford News: Paul Kalanithi

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2015/03/stanford-neurosurgeon-writer-paul-kalanithi-dies-at-37.html

When great souls leave this earth, we mourn.

My condolences go out to his family, friends, patients, and everyone’s lives he touched.  When faced with our own mortality, would we change any aspect of our lives?

24 hours with an anesthesiologist

A piece I’d like to submit for: CNN Money 24 hours With….an anesthesiologist

About Kris:

I grew up in a small west Texas town called Abilene, TX. My mom was a standard tiger mom in that she encouraged me to pursue multiple activities while nudging me to do my best. After drama lessons, tennis lessons, basketball, volleyball, piano, violin, band, taekwondo, pageants, and just life, I left Abilene and pursued a biomedical science degree at Texas A&M University.  My earliest memory of wanting to be a doctor started when I was in the third grade.  I hadn’t been feeling well and was diagnosed with pneumonia — I had been reading a book called This is the Child.  My family practice physician Dr. Lawson was about to prescribe me prednisone, and I immediately got worried because that was the same medication used to help with the child’s leukemia.  Dr. Lawson picked up on my early curiosity and invited me to hang out with him in his medical office observing patients.  After college, med school proved to be a great experience at University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and it felt like learning on steroids (as compared to college).  My clinical rotations led me to the path of choosing anesthesiology as a career.  Anesthesia is the perfect combination of anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, and sociology.  I matched into a terrific internship in Austin, TX and continued my anesthesia training at the prestigious Massachussetts General Hospital.  Following 4 grueling years of training, late nights, memorable cases, and lifelong friendships, I chose to pursue a cardiac anesthesia fellowship at University of California San Diego — a world renowned institution for the treatment of right heart failure following pulmonary thrombosis.  14 years after graduating high school, I have the job of my dreams.  Here’s a sample of my day…

My Day:
Today I’m #2 in our call lineup, which means it will be a pretty busy day. Typically, we have 15 call spots in our main operating room (OR) numbered #1 to #15. #1 position gets the first pick of cases. #2 gets the next pick and so on.

5:45a Early heart day wake up. Today, I will be providing anesthesia to a 70-something year old lady who needs a new heart valve.  On heart days, I wake up at 5:45a to be at work by 6:30. And on regular main OR days, I wake up at 6:15a to be at work by 7:00. Ahhhh… To have more beauty sleep!

6:17a Breakfast in the car – it’s either green juice, Shakeology, or banana on the go!

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Breakfast on the go!

6:31a I meet the patient and her family in the pre-operative area.  We go over a detailed plan for her anesthesia as well as answer any questions.  One of the best parts of my job is meeting all different types of people.  It’s an amazing feeling to meet people at one of their most vulnerable moments in their lives and win over their trust and respect.  It is my job to safely manage their physiologic processes.  Oftentimes, patients tell me it is the anesthesiologist who is the most important part of a surgery — they understand how easy it is to bring them close to the brink of death and then revive them back to a wakeful state.  It’s incredible the amount of trust patients place in your hands in such a short time after meeting them.

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7:15am The patient is under anesthesia and all invasive monitoring lines (arterial, central venous pressure, cordis, pulmonary artery lines) have been placed.  The transesophageal echocardiogram is performed and results are relayed to the cardiac surgeon.


7:45am Cardiac surgeon makes incision.  The patient is monitored throughout the case.  Multiple screens show all the physiologic monitoring results.

10:00a Bathroom break! Partners/colleagues break each other out so there is always an anesthesiologist monitoring the patient.  It’s also a good time to grab a snack!

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My work bag with some life saving snacks to avoid hangriness!

11:32a Drop first patient off in Cardiac Care Unit and grab some lunch. The doctor’s lounge keeps us fed with soup and salad. Today, I’m feeling the vegetable soup. Grab a quick bathroom break and then to interview the next patient.

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Lunch on the go!

11:45a Electrophysiology study for atrial fibrillation ablation. The view from this OR is such a delight!

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The view from my little nook.

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14:00 I get a call from our anesthesia czar, one of my partners who runs the schedule. He was wondering if I would make my 15:00 hip replacement. After a quick conversation, we decide that I would call him in 30 minutes for an update.

14:33 We are finishing up with the current case and I call the czar back to find out about my next case. I learned that there is an emergent heart that will be started by another colleague and that I will continue the lineup in EP (so my day went from a 16:30 finish on paper to roughly a 19:00 finish). Anytime I am in the top 5 call positions, I know not to make defined plans because you never know if there will be add-ons or changes to the schedule. This makes my social life a bit frustrating as my non-medical friends have a tough time understanding and adapting to this “you don’t get out of work at 5p?” concept.


15:20p Drop patient off in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). Grab a quick snack and head back to EP for the next patient.

15:25p Speak to the next patient who has arrived for an a-fib ablation as well. Induce and get started with the case.

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19:22 Drop last patient off in the PACU.  As #2 on the call list, I look at my watch and realize that I am #2 at night.  This means I will be the 2nd person they call tonight if extra rooms in the OR get booked (traumas, heart call, etc.).  As much as I’d love to head home and grab a glass of wine and unwind, I meet up a friend for dinner to catch up and relax.

21:42 Head home. Shower. Brush my teeth and get into bed.  There’s always a risk of being called into work.  Tomorrow will be a shorter day.  After the hectic day, I am still thankful for my wonderful job and colleagues.  Looking back at my journey to get here, I smile because I couldn’t be happier.

Adversity

After A While
by Veronica A. Shoffstall

After a while you learn the subtle difference between holding a hand and chaining a soul
And you learn that love doesn’t mean leaning and company doesn’t mean security.
And you begin to learn that kisses aren’t contracts
and presents aren’t promises
And you begin to accept your defeats
with your head up and your eyes ahead with the grace of a woman, not the grief of a child
And you learn to build all your roads on today
because tomorrow’s ground is too uncertain for plans
and futures have a way of falling down in mid-flight.

After a while you learn that even sunshine burns
if you get too much.

So you plant your own garden and decorate your own soul
instead of waiting for someone to bring you flowers.

And you learn that you really can endure
that you really are strong
and that you really do have worth
And you learn and you learn
with every goodbye you learn…

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